Tech help for the PC
User avatar
By Wooster
#2130
The PC won't be using a password to connect to the printer, they're only used for direct WiFi connections.

On the PC, the printer will be configured as a Network Printer with a TCP/IP connection and it's likely the PC is trying to contact it on the wrong IP Address, which may have changed at random, unless it's MAC was reserved on the router with a static IP.

Get the IP from Devices & Printers>Right Click on Printer>Printer Properties>Ports and check it against the IP address the printer says it has.
If it'd different on the PC, you can configure it with the correct one from the same interface.
User avatar
By loughor
#2131
I was talking about the general router admin password. Nothing to do with printers (if your comment was directed in my general direction). If Glam changed the password then it would be unlikely someone got in easily and changed anything. I mentioned it as he's had NAS issues because of that. Me, I use a static IP for my printer so I know it is always in the same network place, like the servers and NAS.
User avatar
By Wooster
#2132
Crossed wires mate. :)

Regarding that detected 'threat' on Glams router.
The source IP belongs to United Protection Security.
(Home alarm or CCTV fitted?)
User avatar
By loughor
#2133
I hoped that was the case. You need literal crossed wires in comms (sometimes) but not metaphorical ones in chat.

By 'eck, typing that reminded be of when I made up serial comms cables by hand, crimping pins and everything. We did whole sites running terminals, and latterly PCs with terminal emulators. But I'll stfu there before I go off topic any more.
User avatar
By Wooster
#2135
I installed something the other week that used an HDMI connection for power and comms, not video or audio.
For the life of me I can't recall what it was.
User avatar
By Glamdring
#2140
Wooster wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 9:59 am
The PC won't be using a password to connect to the printer, they're only used for direct WiFi connections.

On the PC, the printer will be configured as a Network Printer with a TCP/IP connection and it's likely the PC is trying to contact it on the wrong IP Address, which may have changed at random, unless it's MAC was reserved on the router with a static IP.

Get the IP from Devices & Printers>Right Click on Printer>Printer Properties>Ports and check it against the IP address the printer says it has.
If it'd different on the PC, you can configure it with the correct one from the same interface.
I thought. The PC is not connected by cable to the printer. It prints, when it works, wirelessly through the router like all my other devices. So why it alone when the others work?
User avatar
By Wooster
#2142
Glamdring wrote:
Fri Sep 08, 2017 9:55 pm
The PC is not connected by cable to the printer. It prints, when it works, wirelessly through the router like all my other devices. So why it alone when the others work?
I didn't say it was connected to the printer, I meant the PC was connected to the router by a cable.
(Therefore not a direct WiFi connection to the printer) ;)


Did you run through the troubleshooting steps I mentioned.
User avatar
By Glamdring
#2163
How do I know what IP the printer thinks it has? Isn't the wireless signal to all my devices coming from the router?
User avatar
By loughor
#2166
Printers these days let you print a configuration page. Also, you should be able to assign it a static IP. That way, you'll never lose it. If you don't do that, check the router for a list of DHCP clients.
User avatar
By Wooster
#2167
It's better to reserve an address on the router, based on the device MAC.
That way the router won't allocate the IP to any other device.

If you apply it on the device itself, without reserving it on the router, then you could end up with an IP conflict if DHCP is used for everything else.
i.e. If it's switched off, the address could be allocated to another device and then neither will work when it's switched on again. :)
User avatar
By Glamdring
#2168
I did that with NAS. Then I changed my router when the old one went a bit wonky. The trouble I had getting the NAS to release the static IP went beyond a factory reset. It took ages and I gave up on the machine for months. Finally I did get it back but I'm reluctant to do any more static stuff.

Strangely, tonight, I did an update for Stardock, which I have installed. It's been begging me to update for weeks but always when I was playing Tanks online. Tonight I let it update and the printer instantly cleared itself of three identical documents I'd been trying to test print for a week. Wonder if it'll work tomorrow.
User avatar
By Wooster
#2169
That would concern me, if Stardock was affecting your network.
Why should it be involved in that at all?

p.s. Reserving the IP on the router means you don't have to faff around with the settings on the devices themselves, you can leave them on DHCP.
User avatar
By loughor
#2171
Another way that I do is restrict the DHCP pool to something like 100, 150 or 200 (up to the user) IPs and then use IPs outside for statics. I tried allocating on the router by MAC but I prefer my other way. I'm sure Wooster's way is technically better but mine works.
User avatar
By Wooster
#2172
Aye that would work, some larger retail businesses do that (everything on static with a small DHCP pool for guests).

You'd need to remember the static addresses used though, and it wouldn't have helped Glam's sticky IP.
Reserving stuff on the router also makes it easier to apply QoS and Port Forwarding settings, since the details are already in there. ;)
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