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Splinter

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on: June 18, 2020, 02:49:57 PM
I bought some new riding boots not long ago and when I went to ride away, I realised that they were too chunky to get comfortably under the gear pedal.
Anyway, I took some tools with me for a test ride down the road, stopping to make adjustments to the height of the pedal. This can be done in two ways - one where the link connects to the spline of the gearbox and the other is an adjustable rod connecting the pedal with the splined connector, so the adjustments are plentiful.
Having the height of the pedal absolutely just right is pretty fundamental to effortless gear changes, i.e, just a flick of the ankle should be required, bearing in mind that all movements of the foot are upwards, except for 1st and/or neutral.
Long story short, I simply couldn't find a sweet spot and the closest I got still required actual upward movement of my left leg to change gear, which was a complete fu**ing pain.
I've come across this before and always use the same boots for riding, regardless, because the combination of boot size (i.e the chunky bit over the toes) and the gap between peg and pedal has to be just right. For me anyway.
Rant over, I feel better now, but am selling the boots :(


Wooster

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Reply #1 on: June 18, 2020, 06:16:10 PM
I ride with the pegs under my toes so my whole foot is moving to change gear anyway, but it's weird how the lever being a couple of mm out feels like a million miles.


Splinter

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Reply #2 on: June 19, 2020, 02:30:56 PM
Indeed, it does make a huge difference mate.
Perhaps it's also because my pegs are more like footboards? I can't bend my foot so much.


Another thing. I've been watching a few videos on bike steering and the host points out some things about steering that I've never really thought about because you do them instinctively.
Like not actually turning the handlebars at speed, but moving your body with slight downwards push left or right. No one actually turns the bars at speed anyway.


Wooster

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Reply #3 on: June 19, 2020, 07:02:57 PM
You have a cruiser type bike, designed to go in a straight line, so it's a different (more relaxed) riding style where a weight shift might not really make much difference.
On a full sports bike, even dropping your head to one side can make it turn with the weight shift. For want of a better word they're very 'tippy' due to the forks being more upright.
They tip over so readily though that, at speed, you need to counter steer to stop the front wheel trying to fold itself under the bike.
i.e. At say 140mph, as you hit a right hand bend, there's a lot of effort involved in pushing the handlebars away with your right hand and pulling in with your left hand, just to stop the front wheel tucking under and fucking you off it.  :grin: (It's what you'd see speedway riders doing as they corner, but for completly different reasons)

It's all about rake and trail: https://www.rideapart.com/articles/253963/unravelling-the-mysteries-of-rake-and-trail/

Even on my old YZF600R Sports Tourer, you can do a fair amount of steering by leaning (putting pressure) on the foot pegs.
That's why I ride with the balls of my feet on the pegs, but it's not the only reason.  :grin: I figure it'd be easier to vault off the fucker and take my chances with the road from the balls of my feet.  :wink:



Splinter

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Reply #4 on: June 21, 2020, 01:16:55 PM
I can't imagine going at 140mph on a bike. I'd probably have kittens.
Mine's not a very fast bike at 350cc, so I suppose the maximum I've done is about 75mph (120kph) which feels fast enough, but also the engine is working really hard, even though it has five gears.
That article is interesting and yes, my forks have a larger angle of rake and also a larger turning circle, but it's very comfy to ride.
This is at a beach in Uruguay, by the way.



Wooster

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Reply #5 on: June 21, 2020, 08:45:18 PM
Cruisers are built for comfort.  :cool:
If you ever rode a full sports bike it'd feel very strange, since your head feels like it's directly over the front wheel and they drop into corners very very quickly.  :smiley:


Splinter

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Reply #6 on: August 13, 2020, 05:26:41 PM
Yeah, I prefer the comfy feel  :cool:
I fitted a new headlight last week as the old one was utter crap.
New vs old




Now I can see where I'm going!
 :laugh:


Wooster

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Reply #7 on: August 16, 2020, 01:54:19 PM
It's a good feeling.  :cheesy:


Splinter

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Reply #8 on: December 05, 2020, 06:04:52 PM
This is a new model from the same company that made my Jawa, now known as RVM.
It's a V800 built in Argentina and I'm saving my pennies.


Wooster

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Reply #9 on: December 05, 2020, 06:15:56 PM
Nice. 😎😎😎