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Glamdring

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Reply #25 on: December 23, 2018, 10:44:35 AM
I gave it ten minutes. The Year is 2045 and yet the graphics are 2005 standard. I'd have expected real-life standard by then. And a neural net interface so there's none of the running around like mad people with a Wi. Just silly.


Fambly Guy

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Reply #26 on: December 23, 2018, 09:09:14 PM
I gave it ten minutes. The Year is 2045 and yet the graphics are 2005 standard. I'd have expected real-life standard by then. And a neural net interface so there's none of the running around like mad people with a Wi. Just silly.

Real life standard? I'd maybe expect some games to support real time ray tracing by then.   :tongue:


Wooster

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Reply #27 on: December 26, 2018, 10:56:05 PM
Rampage is a pretty solid monster movie, that I really quite enjoyed.  :cool:


Glamdring

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Reply #28 on: December 27, 2018, 09:57:19 PM
I gave it a quarter hour then fell asleep.


Wooster

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Reply #29 on: December 27, 2018, 10:31:57 PM
That's your age showing.  :cheesy:

It takes 20 minutes to get started


Glamdring

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Reply #30 on: December 29, 2018, 09:17:08 PM
Okay, I restarted Rampage at 20 mins and it was watchable, if very silly. Some pretty good CGI.


Glamdring

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Reply #31 on: December 30, 2018, 09:40:44 PM
A Wrinkle in Time, an enchanting fairy story, well told and with decent CGI, and a dark edge.


Fambly Guy

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Reply #32 on: December 31, 2018, 10:45:00 AM
Bandersnatch, on Netflix.

That's all I'm saying.


Wooster

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Reply #33 on: December 31, 2018, 10:55:29 AM
Interesting idea but I wondered if I'd be paralysed by indecision.  :grin:


Wooster

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Reply #34 on: December 31, 2018, 11:01:02 PM
A Wrinkle in Time, an enchanting fairy story, well told and with decent CGI, and a dark edge.

I gave it a go.
I'm a 52 year old man, so I'm about 40 years off their target audience and I've seen the basic premise loads of times.

Not my bag.

I rented Deadpool 2 (£1.99 on Amazon), something I don't often do.
It was OK, but the kid was a prick, so it sort of fell apart around him being a central character.


Glamdring

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Reply #35 on: December 31, 2018, 11:56:55 PM
I finished watching Watership Down. Excellent. At least as good as the original. Loved it. Very close to the book.


Glamdring

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Reply #36 on: January 04, 2019, 09:30:31 PM
Quite liked Wildthing. Fantasy, horror sort of.


Wooster

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Reply #37 on: January 04, 2019, 10:10:44 PM
I watched the latest Tomb Raider on Netflix.

I've seen worse.   :azn:


[PCF]Falcs

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Reply #38 on: January 05, 2019, 07:24:49 PM
Just Watched Hunter Killer its not to bad a movie


Wooster

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Reply #39 on: January 10, 2019, 04:18:17 PM
Watching 2001 (again) for the first time in a while and it's still remarkable for a 50 year old film.
The attention to detail is stunning.
(I was talking to Keasy about it a couple of months ago and he mentioned that no-one would go to the expense of making up that rotating set these days...they'd just CGI the fuck out of it, but you still notice the difference between the physical and the simulated after all these years.)

I have a far larger (2.5x) TV than the one I originally watched it on back in the early 80's and I had a minor brainwave.  :exclaim:
Watching it now it's usually on the Cinemascope/Panavision(?) aspect ratio with the letterbox bars top and bottom, but I changed the aspect ratio to crop out the bars and maintain the scale for full screen (no stretching just zoom) and it makes a difference.  :cool:



btw I wondered if the Daisy Daisy (Daisy Bell) song had any significance (when Dave was shutting down HAL) and it was a throwback to the launch of an IBM computer speech synthesis demo that Clarke had witnessed in 1961 (HAL being one letter back from IBM, as everyone knows)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2019, 04:20:29 PM by Wooster »


Wooster

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Reply #40 on: February 02, 2019, 12:11:14 AM


Not a fan of Manga
They always seem to feature female teens with a suppressed violent streak.

It's not something you see every day.

Male teens... entirely different story.  :cheesy:
« Last Edit: February 02, 2019, 12:17:01 AM by Wooster »


Splinter

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Reply #41 on: February 02, 2019, 01:45:19 PM
Watching 2001 (again) for the first time in a while and it's still remarkable for a 50 year old film.
The attention to detail is stunning.
(I was talking to Keasy about it a couple of months ago and he mentioned that no-one would go to the expense of making up that rotating set these days...they'd just CGI the fuck out of it, but you still notice the difference between the physical and the simulated after all these years.)

I have a far larger (2.5x) TV than the one I originally watched it on back in the early 80's and I had a minor brainwave.  :exclaim:
Watching it now it's usually on the Cinemascope/Panavision(?) aspect ratio with the letterbox bars top and bottom, but I changed the aspect ratio to crop out the bars and maintain the scale for full screen (no stretching just zoom) and it makes a difference.  :cool:



btw I wondered if the Daisy Daisy (Daisy Bell) song had any significance (when Dave was shutting down HAL) and it was a throwback to the launch of an IBM computer speech synthesis demo that Clarke had witnessed in 1961 (HAL being one letter back from IBM, as everyone knows)
This is one of my favourite films of all time. I remember watching it for the first time at a cinema in Southampton in 1977 and since then, have watched it countless times.
I still have the boxed collectors DVD with a sample film strip inside.
Last year it was remastered to 4k blu-ray and I'd love to see that.
https://www.avforums.com/review/2001-A-Space-Odyssey-4K-Blu-ray-Review%20.15526


richietog

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Reply #42 on: February 17, 2019, 12:09:27 AM
Not much going on in the cinemas these days


Glamdring

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Reply #43 on: March 03, 2019, 06:32:09 PM
I'm watching the extended edition of Aliens. An hour in and some decent new scenes.
Now. The film opens with the colonists happy and busy colonising. Include little Newt, the girl.
A signal from the planet to earth takes two weeks.
No signal arrives so they put together a mission. Ripley and the marines are put into suspended animation pods, but when they eventually land and find Newt she's hardly aged. What was the point of going into suspended animation? There can't have been more than a few months.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2019, 10:33:22 AM by Glamdring »


Wooster

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Reply #44 on: March 04, 2019, 04:17:28 AM
To save carting a few extra tonnes of food and water?   :question:


Glamdring

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Reply #45 on: March 04, 2019, 10:38:28 AM
Maybe, but on a ship that size - it's huge - it would hardly seem to matter.

I note that the actress who played Newt only ever made that one film. She's a primary school teacher now. Even back then in the late eighties before social media her parents received lunatic phone calls saying their daughter should never have been cast. Pre-cyber bullying.


Wooster

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Reply #46 on: March 04, 2019, 06:05:01 PM
What's the score with Clamshell phones in the USA, they still use them, even in new movies?

I don't think I ever used one, but I've been using smartphones for 12 or 13 years, so why haven't they caught up?


Glamdring

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Reply #47 on: March 05, 2019, 01:49:31 PM
Mobile contracts are way more expensive over there than here, and they're not offered the sort of phone deals we are (not that our deals are good, just a form of expensive hire purchase). So they keep their phones a lot longer. The internet itself is much more expensive too because there's so little competition, sometimes one company in a city the size of Birmingham.


Wooster

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Reply #48 on: March 05, 2019, 03:00:40 PM
That's probably why.

I have cousins in Canada who commented on this when they were over, surprised that SIM contracts weren't tied to phones and numbers weren't tied to SIM contracts.

In their experience, you bought a phone and the carrier dictated the new number for the SIM you had to use with it.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 03:02:11 PM by Wooster »


Splinter

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Reply #49 on: March 06, 2019, 09:41:59 AM
I watched some of Rampage on my neighbouring 787 passenger's screen, whilst on my own screen I watched All The President's Men.
The in flight entertainment on the Dreamliner is impressive, including games and a 3D flight view, including cockpit.