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Wooster

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on: October 10, 2018, 08:28:02 PM
I was genuinely surprised at something the other day.
I recall Richie's housing problem and the rent levels he has to pay .

Scotland have built more council houses since 2013 than England has, despite being 1/10th of the population.
It's so surprising that even The Sun felt fit to report it (very briefly): https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/7457338/snp-nicola-sturgeon-council-houses/


This is not a political dig, but the mismatch is dramatic.
Why can we finance a tenfold council house build than England can manage?
Something isn't right.

These aren't Tory 'affordable housing' that you need to get a (£100k+) mortgage for I think, they seem to be  genuine council houses.  :shocked:


« Last Edit: October 10, 2018, 08:38:00 PM by Wooster »


Wooster

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Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 08:43:12 PM
Is Brexit still happening?

Haven't heard anything about it for two days.
Still....I think it's probably something that's now happening to us and not really by us.


Glamdring

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Reply #2 on: October 10, 2018, 09:45:30 PM
It's been that way since the day after the vote.


Wooster

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Reply #3 on: October 10, 2018, 10:28:35 PM
Welcome to the club.


Wooster

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Reply #4 on: October 11, 2018, 08:54:53 PM
Bob Rogers aka Baron Lisvane of Blakemere was on the news earlier to speak about his new bill to update the Act of Union, but the first words out of his moth were a lie.
He said that the bill is being proposed by members of all political parties and none, but the second largest party in the UK doesn't nominate anyone for the House of Lords and haven't been consulted.
Poor bloke probably needs some help to pull his head out of his arse.


[PCF]Falcs

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Reply #5 on: October 12, 2018, 11:03:25 PM
They may be building more but how much is it costing the taxpayer?


Wooster

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Reply #6 on: October 12, 2018, 11:19:22 PM
Not a vast amount. I think the cost to the taxpayer is actually £0.
The councils borrow the money to build the houses and pay it back from the rent (it's not like the country is short of potential tenants).
https://news.gov.scot/news/scottish-council-housing-income-and-expenditure-statistics-2015-16 (5th paragraph Total HRA)

How much has it cost us to subsidise private housing so far?
£32Bn as of last year: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/affordable-housing-spending-private-tory-government-a7945616.html

-edit- I see the rent in my area will go up by 2.7% for six years to help subsidise the builds here (they're getting rid of most of the tower blocks as they're getting beyond economic repair), so an extra couple of quid a week.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 11:31:36 PM by Wooster »


richietog

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Reply #7 on: October 13, 2018, 10:46:33 AM
I was genuinely surprised at something the other day.
I recall Richie's housing problem and the rent levels he has to pay .

Scotland have built more council houses since 2013 than England has, despite being 1/10th of the population.
It's so surprising that even The Sun felt fit to report it (very briefly): https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/7457338/snp-nicola-sturgeon-council-houses/


This is not a political dig, but the mismatch is dramatic.
Why can we finance a tenfold council house build than England can manage?
Something isn't right.

These aren't Tory 'affordable housing' that you need to get a (£100k+) mortgage for I think, they seem to be  genuine council houses.  :shocked:

I don't normally read that rag, but it's interesting if true. My bruv was saying that if the inevitable happens with Brexit, then rents will go down in London. I can only see that happening if people do leave the country and the economy does go shit state


Wooster

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Reply #8 on: October 13, 2018, 11:28:31 AM
Some reckon that property prices could drop by 10-20% in London/SE post-Brexit, so it'll depend on how landlords react I suppose and also how many properties become available.


It wouldn't surprise me if Westminster bails out those 'poor' homeowners again as well.


richietog

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Reply #9 on: October 13, 2018, 11:52:16 AM
I know what you mean by 'poor' homeowners


richietog

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Reply #10 on: October 15, 2018, 01:05:27 PM
Apparently, two have admitted to having sex, or IVF treatment after their marriage in May

Can never understand that kind if announcement to the world, but there you go

 :cheesy:


Wooster

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Reply #11 on: October 16, 2018, 08:41:30 PM
Brexit negotiations continue to go as well as expected before we voted.
There's still a chance for the rabbit to make an appearance from the magic hat though, so it's going brilliantly in that respect.

This still isn't a UK decision, it's a half arsed, ill contrived and jingoistic English Independence movement.*


*(.....if I conveniently forget about the million Brexit voters in Scotland.....but they're a' dafties.)

« Last Edit: October 16, 2018, 11:21:18 PM by Wooster »


Wooster

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Glamdring

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Reply #13 on: October 17, 2018, 08:57:37 AM
I read that. One of the weaknesses of the EU. But if you're rich you can do almost anything.


Wooster

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Reply #14 on: October 17, 2018, 10:48:36 AM
Apparently it's a global thing.
It's like registering ships.


Wooster

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Reply #15 on: October 17, 2018, 03:42:38 PM
I heard this further example of being out of touch on the radio the other night and didn't know who it was.


Andrew Bridgen MP (you'll know him, he the one that's always on TV saying he has enough signed letters to force a vote of no confidence in May) appears to think that anyone from England  (he didn't expand the claim to include Wales or Scotland) can pop over to the Republic of Ireland and pick up an Irish passport, no questions asked.
It's obvious bollocks but it didn't stop him arguing his case, until a news break gave him the opportunity to hang up.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/irish-passport-england-uk-andrew-bridgen-tory-mp-brexit-border-eu-a8587286.html


Wooster

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Reply #16 on: October 17, 2018, 08:52:26 PM
Gov needs to come up with £1.7Bn to correct benefits underpayment.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45892109

It's not like they weren't told there was an issue..years ago.

PIP should be up next for scrutiny, given reports that many people who were approved for the payments had their assessments 'audited' at a later date.
These 'audits' generally consisted of unticking every box that would have approved a candidate for the benefit, in order to deny them the benefit.
That's not an audit, it's a burn order.
http://www.thenational.scot/news/16982423.mp-marion-fellows-in-call-for-answers-over-impact-of-anonymous-benefit-claim-audits/


So, according to the Hunchback of Westminster "Austerity is over" which, if true, will cost an extra £19Bn, they have £1.7Bn to pay out over this part of the benefits fiasco and the Brexit bollox is costing us around £500m per week (according to recent sources), with worse to come.

On a positive note......
I'm single with no debt and happy to pay the slightly higher taxes we have here (it helps pay for stuff people rely on).
« Last Edit: October 17, 2018, 08:57:59 PM by Wooster »


Glamdring

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Reply #17 on: October 17, 2018, 11:20:20 PM
PIP was always a system to save money and was prompted by the vigorous media reports of fraud, not all of which were false, of course, but that reassessment is downright Stalinist. He'd have been proud of them. So would Putin.


Wooster

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Reply #18 on: Today at 12:00:10 AM
Only a few days ago the Gov announced they were going to stamp down on fraudulent prescriptions in NHS England, which is very similar to the justification for PIP.

It'll save £250m per year, they say, but the pharmacists are already up in arms about it because they're expected to police it and many are genuine mistakes on repeat prescriptions that haven't been updated.
Understandably people in England are a bit riled since we get free prescriptions in Scotland, as do the Welsh (not sure about NI).

Anyhoozles, the Scottish Tories had been banging on since the free prescriptions were introduced here about reintroducing them, and the Scottish Gov did a feasibility study.
It turns out that bringing them back is more expensive than the free system, so the Tories wound their necks back in.

btw, £250m is less than a quarter of 1 percent of the NHS budget in England, and while any saving could be a good thing, is it really worthwhile if it really is the case that most of them are down to administration errors?