PC-Forums


Brexit: Endgame?

Wooster · 318 · 16492

Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #225 on: August 28, 2019, 10:41:54 PM
I think it might already have, her best option would have been a blunt refusal to get involved (or hoofed Mogg clean in the bollocks for having the temerity to drag her into it). It's not unconstitutional because we don't have one.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 10:45:59 PM by Wooster »


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #226 on: August 28, 2019, 11:05:44 PM
Of course she has, no-one is holding a gun to her head.   :wink:

True, its too complicated for me to explain, this goes back to the days of King George the 3rd aka the mad one, where Parliament at the time decided to take more powers from the monarch, hence leaving them with basically not a lot of room to do things other than be a more ceremonial monarch. I'm sure that the Queen would want to see a settlement to the crisis. I can't second guess, let alone guess what the Queen thinks. But to take away most of the monarch's powers on the basis of one mad King, is silly. I reckon the monarch should have more powers in their dealings with Parliament.

They've only got a slight problem now, if she did have more powers tomorrow, what really can she do? Most people would be calling for the abolition of the monarchy if they interfered


Sacked Matt

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 33
Reply #227 on: September 02, 2019, 02:06:53 PM
So will we even have to wait twenty four hours from when this is posted to the announcement of a general election?

Assuming that one is called to be held between now and 31 October, can any further negotiations be held with the EU during that period? I believe that ministers remain in post through the campaign, but they are surely not in a position to make offers, requests or demands to anyone? Perhaps it's a needless question anyway as there hasn't even been a sniff of anyone in the government having a clue about a realistic proposal towards reaching an agreement. Or even any hint of much desire to achieve one.

Perhaps this is the entire point of it all anyway... campaigning takes away any ability to negotiate, effectively leaving us with nothing other than a no deal crashing out, guaranteeing that the Brexit Party don't need to stand against any Conservative candidates. Javid is cooking up a further pile of bribes to the electorate for Wednesday so large it will make the forest fires in the Amazon look like candles on a toddler's birthday cake. I can't see much cause for optimism anywhere on the horizon.


Glamdring

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 723
Reply #228 on: September 02, 2019, 06:30:19 PM
I've not been optimistic since the referendum. Three years of feeling betrayed.


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #229 on: September 02, 2019, 08:29:42 PM
Johnson said that if the legal action outlaws the no deal agreement, then he would. Basically threatening us for him to get booted out..........ok, I can live with that


Sacked Matt

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 33
Reply #230 on: September 03, 2019, 11:01:18 AM
I don't really get the point of today's bill to prevent the no deal scenario. As far as I can see it requires Johnson to request a further three month extension, but surely that isn't enough time to achieve anything.  Would any longer delay really convince any MPs not to support the bill when this shorter one will? Six months won't even be enough based on our previous performance.

Don't waste it, was the advice for the last extension and the Tories proceeded to waste the summer fighting a leadership battle, game out ways to undermine Parliament and  keep trying to gaslight people in to thinking that their apparent plans tally precisely with an overwhelming verdict from the electorate three years ago.

Still, any delay would be better than no delay, to corrupt a phrase.


Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #231 on: September 03, 2019, 11:20:50 AM
It'll thwart Johnsons plans though.


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #232 on: September 03, 2019, 01:46:40 PM
I don't really get the point of today's bill to prevent the no deal scenario. As far as I can see it requires Johnson to request a further three month extension, but surely that isn't enough time to achieve anything.  Would any longer delay really convince any MPs not to support the bill when this shorter one will? Six months won't even be enough based on our previous performance.

Don't waste it, was the advice for the last extension and the Tories proceeded to waste the summer fighting a leadership battle, game out ways to undermine Parliament and  keep trying to gaslight people in to thinking that their apparent plans tally precisely with an overwhelming verdict from the electorate three years ago.

Still, any delay would be better than no delay, to corrupt a phrase.

The way I see it, it will delay any US grab and take scenario, where Mr Bolton said that they want to have a trade sector by sector. With the POTUS constantly bleating "America first", I can only think it as that they really mean by "sector by sector" is being delayed also. I can't obviously prove it, but I don't like the sound of that to be honest


Sacked Matt

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 33
Reply #233 on: September 03, 2019, 04:40:20 PM
There goes the majority. If Johnson gets his election, I just hope the electorate send a bunch more seats in a similar direction, especially Uxbridge and South Ruislip.


Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #234 on: September 03, 2019, 09:00:40 PM
I'm pro Scottish indy, so we're looking at this Westminster debacle from a distance that isn't just geographical.

We've never voted for a Tory Government in 50 years, because we never trusted the cunts. We did vote labour, but the 'trust' we had evaporated, starting with Blairs War, Browns raping of pensions and not much in the way of forward looking policies since.

So we moved in a different direction long ago.

Current predictions on a GE here are that the SNP would get 52 of the 59 Westminster seats available (I think it's one Labour, a couple of Tories and the rest LibDem)

That's a clear indication for independence from the current, broken and dysfunctional, parliamentary system in Westminster.

... and you can carry on getting your shit stolen from under your tax paying feet as normal.


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #235 on: September 04, 2019, 10:25:34 PM
The mess needs to be sorted out, I'm so fed up with it to be honest

3 years since the vote, and it seems like we've reached an impasse


Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #236 on: September 04, 2019, 10:44:11 PM
Well Boris isn't. Apparently they're not even bothering to negotiate because Cummins wants a no deal crash out.


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #237 on: September 04, 2019, 11:01:43 PM
It seems that way, unfortunately. I don't fancy chlorinated chicken to be honest, that is also pumped full of drugs either


Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #238 on: September 05, 2019, 08:56:52 AM
Chicken everywhere is pumped full of antibiotics, it makes them grow really quickly but is a huge problem as far as antibiotic resistance is concerned.


Glamdring

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 723
Reply #239 on: September 05, 2019, 10:59:41 AM
Not here or in Europe. Not allowed. That's one the main arguments about accepting US chickens.


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #240 on: September 05, 2019, 12:40:03 PM
Jo Johnson has resigned his quit his post as minister and Tory MP, he voted to Remain apparently. It seems he wanted country before family. Not commenting any further


Sacked Matt

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 33
Reply #241 on: September 05, 2019, 04:16:45 PM
All of these moderate Conservatives expelled from the party that are now standing down have surely guaranteed that the party will replace them with govermnent-approved delusional lunatic candidates that Farage's gang might have even questioned the credibility of. The rabid media will keep supporting the party regardless and our hopeless electoral system ensures no seats will be lost when Corbyn gives Johnson his election next week. And they claim it's the EU that's unrepresentative.


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #242 on: September 06, 2019, 09:53:16 PM
All of these moderate Conservatives expelled from the party that are now standing down have surely guaranteed that the party will replace them with govermnent-approved delusional lunatic candidates that Farage's gang might have even questioned the credibility of. The rabid media will keep supporting the party regardless and our hopeless electoral system ensures no seats will be lost when Corbyn gives Johnson his election next week. And they claim it's the EU that's unrepresentative.

That's the irony of it all. I think most of the population really don't like Corbyn, not because of Antisemitism, personally think that no one in their right minds believes that. Its because he doesn't sing the national anthem. Others just bluster along, I know, but it looks good for those who "sing" it apparently


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #243 on: September 07, 2019, 05:33:05 PM
All of these moderate Conservatives expelled from the party that are now standing down have surely guaranteed that the party will replace them with govermnent-approved delusional lunatic candidates that Farage's gang might have even questioned the credibility of. The rabid media will keep supporting the party regardless and our hopeless electoral system ensures no seats will be lost when Corbyn gives Johnson his election next week. And they claim it's the EU that's unrepresentative.

That's the irony of it all. I think most of the population really don't like Corbyn, not because of Antisemitism, personally think that no one in their right minds believes that. Its because he doesn't sing the national anthem. Others just bluster along, I know, but it looks good for those who "sing" it apparently

I meant alleged antisemitism, as I don't believe criticism of a country for their appalling human rights record, is antisemitism


Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #244 on: September 07, 2019, 06:19:48 PM
I don't believe that criticism of Israel is anti Semitic either.

And, while we're on the subject I don't sing the 'National Anthem' either...have you read the lyrics?


Glamdring

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 723
Reply #245 on: September 07, 2019, 10:24:02 PM
Yes. It's why only the first verse is ever sung. Usually.


Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #246 on: September 07, 2019, 11:26:15 PM
Not here or in Europe. Not allowed. That's one the main arguments about accepting US chickens.
Our chicken is riddled with antibiotics, they feed it to them like...well, chicken feed.


richietog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 630
Reply #247 on: September 07, 2019, 11:37:30 PM
I don't believe that criticism of Israel is anti Semitic either.

And, while we're on the subject I don't sing the 'National Anthem' either...have you read the lyrics?

Not all of it, until now. But the US national anthem is just as atrocious as ours


Sacked Matt

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 33
Reply #248 on: September 10, 2019, 12:25:21 PM
I believe there have been some anti-semitic elements within an extreme minority of the Labour membership, unless people are mounting some very convoluted campaigns to discredit them - which wouldn't be impossible, I suppose. Criticising Israel's policies is not anti-semitic. Comparing veiled women to letterboxes is islamaphobic.

Corbyn's appearances at alleged terrorist funerals don't play well, worsened by some mealy-mouthed explanations. He does have a tendency to be overly defensive at times, but I suppose anyone would be with Fleet Street overwhelmingly baying for his blood at any oportunity. His highly equivocal stance in the EU referendum and beyond dismays me and he comes across as more of a campaigner than a politician. I think any of the other potential leaders available to the party since Milliband stood down would have provided a better opposition and look far more like a government-in-waiting by now.

On the anthem, I couldn't care less if he doesn't sing it. When Brenda goes, hopefully it can be replaced in full with something less dirgey. The French, for me, have the best anthem, though maybe we could adopt the Spanish approach to the words...



Wooster

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1100
Reply #249 on: September 11, 2019, 10:54:29 AM
Scottish court rules prorogation illegal.